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    Oriental Rug Cleaning Co. Reviewed!!

    Last updated 2 years ago

    • on Google+
    • I have been using Oriental Rug Cleaning for several years. They do an excellent job of cleaning and removing stains. My rugs look new after cleaning. I highly recommend them.

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      Marlene H.

    Oriental Rug Cleaning Co. Reviewed!!

    Last updated 2 years ago

    • on Google+
    • They cleaned my rug very well, in a short amount of time, delivered it, carried it up my stairs and put it where I wanted it. Thanks very much!

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      Liz T.

    Browning and Discoloration Due to Age and Humidity in Oriental Area Rugs

    Last updated 2 years ago

    Browning is a yellow, brown or red discoloration due to degradation of cellulose in the presence of moisture. Cellulose is a material derived from plants that oxidizes or degrades with age producing a natural dye that causes this discoloration called “browning.” An excellent example of cellulosic browning is the yellow discoloration that occurs in a newspaper as it ages. A brown discoloration can also occur when there is incomplete rinsing of high pH detergent residues. Consumer spotters and previous cleanings using inappropriate products usually cause this problem.

    Cellulosic fibers found in rug face yarns or backing materials are the source of browning. The more cellulosic material in a rug, the greater potential for browning exists. The age of the rug is also important because an older rug is more likely to brown. After wet cleaning, the potential for browning depends on the humidity, drying time, materials and age of the rug.

    If browning does develop, it can generally be corrected by the experts at Oriental Rug Cleaning Co. as it is not always a permanent stain. 

     

    Oriental Rug Cleaning Co. Tip of the Week!

    Last updated 2 years ago

    Here’s an easy DIY for fixing scratched furniture. It seems too good to be true! Use a mixture of 1/4 cup vinegar and 3/4 cup olive oil. Use a kitchen rag and just dip it in and rub it on. Keep going until you have gone over the whole table and used almost all of the mixture. It really works! 

    Backing Separation and Latex Decay in Area Rugs

    Last updated 2 years ago

    A tufted rug is composed of multiple layers or backing materials held together with latex glue. The face yarns are tufted into the topmost or primary backing and held in place with latex glue. One or two backings are applied with latex to give the rug dimensional stability. Over time, these backings can separate from the face of the rug. This commonly occurs with hand-tufted rugs due to age, environment, heavy wear, pets and water damage.

    Latex is a plant-based product and is the basis for rubber items such as tires and rubber bands. Like most rubber items, the latex in rugs deteriorates with age. It becomes brittle, dry, and crumbly and loses its ability to hold the multiple backings firmly together. The latex mix contains additives that affect its adhesive and aging properties. One additive is a filler that can be compared to gravel in a concrete mixture. Marble dust (a filler) is added to latex as an extender but has no adhesive qualities. Increased use of these extenders reduces the adhesive power of the latex and over time results in the separation of the backings from the rug. The filler looks like sand or powder. When the latex begins to breakdown, it leaves a powdery residue on the floor underneath the rug. More expensive latex compounds will better withstand aging as well as cleaning, but even these will eventually deteriorate.

    In a few cases, Oriental Rug Cleaning Co. may be able to remove the old latex and re-glue the backings together. However, this is a costly procedure because it is time consuming and requires a great deal of skill. Latex can also off-gas, creating an offensive odor. 

     

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